9 Facts about the Mongolian Death Worm


(1) In the Gobi Desert, a five-foot-long deadly Worm called the Mongolian Death Worm is said to be living. This worm is said to be between two and five feet long and looks like the intestines of the cow.

(2) This worm is usually red in color, sometimes with spikes protruding from both ends. The worm is highly dangerous because it can spray lethal venom and shock waves several feet away.


(3) Ivan Mackerle, head of a Czech research team, has conducted three searches for the worm. In a second attempt, Mackerle used high-powered explosives to extract the worm from the desert, but failed. He returned to the Gobi Desert in 2004. This time he used his low-altitude flying skills to photograph the vast expanse of desert. However, this operation did not allow him to successfully film any evidence of these worms.

(4) Scientists and amateur researchers have long wanted to find a creature that has been circulating among Mongolian nomads for hundreds of years. Maybe in the near future, they will actually get evidence of the worm during an expedition.

(5) Although many scientists do not believe in the existence of the death bug, explorers have learned that many local people claim to be witnesses, and some have seen it multiple times. One witness had an inadvertent encounter with a Mongolian Death Worm that left his arm burned and bruised around the wound.

(6) Mongolian Death Worm is known as a “gut Worm” because witnesses said the creature, which measures 1 to 1.5 meters long, is about the size of a human arm and resembles the intestines of a cow. The worm is dark red and some witnesses say it is spotted. Its tail is very short, in fact, it is difficult to distinguish the head and tail of the Mongolian Death Worm, because no one has ever seen where its eyes, nose and mouth are. It also has a unique way of walking, either rolling forward or wriggling sideways. People can only see it in the hottest months of June and July, and after these two months, it plunges into the sand and begins to “hibernate”. It usually climbs to the ground when the ground is wet after the rain.

(7) Local herders said the Mongolian Death Worm spew a corrosive yellow saliva like sulfuric acid and generates enough electricity to electrocute an adult camel in an instant. So far, no one has photographed Death Worm, and no one has found enough evidence to show that it exists.

(8) According to the movie plot, the Mongolian Death Worm will evolve, as if there are four forms. It seems that the fourth form is not a worm, but a winged thing that captures prey through heat.

(9) Freeman said the existence of a mysterious creature in the Gobi Desert cannot be ruled out, but it is doubtful that a Mongolian Death Worm, as locals call it, could be so deadly.

Freeman said the existence of a mysterious creature in the Gobi Desert cannot be ruled out, but it is doubtful that a Mongolian Death Worm, as locals call it, could be so deadly. He was reminded of the salamander myth of medieval Europe, when the salamander was thought to be highly venomous, and it was even speculated that Alexander lost hundreds of soldiers by drinking from streams where salamanders lived. But now scientists know that salamanders are non-toxic. In addition, similar terrible legends exist in today’s Sudan, where it is widely believed that the boa constrictor is so venomous that anyone who touches it will die. The truth is, this python is not poisonous at all.


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